National Architectures in Europe

Hôtel de ville de Stockholm, façade donnant sur le lac Mälar. Arch. Ragnar ÖSTBERG (1911-1923). J. ROOSVAL dir., Stockholms Stadshus, Stockholm, Gunnar Tisells tekniska förlag, 1923. Paris, Bib. Nordique. Stockholm's city hall, facade on the lake Mälar. Arch. Ragnar ÖSTBERG (1911-1923). J. ROOSVAL dir., Stockholms Stadshus, Stockholm, Gunnar Tisells tekniska förlag, 1923. Paris, Bib. Nordique. 
Auteur-e-s: 

The concept of a national architecture was born in the eighteenth century in England, where the Neo-Gothic emerged as a symbol of the kingdom’s influence and would soon been reoriented by the Arts and Crafts movement towards the vernacular. In Germany, the completion of Cologne Cathedral gave the movement an ultra-romantic appearance, which competed with the Rundbogenstil. In France, the Neo-Gothic, which was theorized by rationalist architects close to Viollet-le-Duc, competed with the more regionalist Neo-Romanesque movement. National architectures then proliferated in Europe from 1880 to 1920. The primary ingredients of this architectural recycling of the past included popular culture (Hungary), the mythical roots of territories (Finland, Catalonia), and the natural beauty of local materials (Sweden).

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